Category Archives: Uncategorized

WEEKLY ROUND UP 04/22/16

weeklyroundup_NCEA-Talk

Didn’t have the chance to check in with NCEA Talk each day? We’ve got you covered. Each Friday NCEA Talk will post a roundup of Catholic education news and resources from the week.

In case you missed it…

No Time Limit For Proclaiming The Good News About Catholic Education

STREAM in Action: 3D Printing

School Renovations Facilitate STREAM Program Implementation

MORE TIME TO APPLY FOR E-RATE

Earth Day at Holy Family Catholic School

Other news and resources:

Make sure to follow all of NCEA’s conversations!

  • STREAM2.0 using #CathEdSTREAM
  • NCEA Exceptional Learners using #CathEdExcLearners
  • Teacher Appreciation Week using #CathEdTeacher

MORE TIME TO APPLY FOR E-RATE

This post was contributed by Dale McDonald, PBVM, PhD, NCEA Director of Public Policy.

The Universal Service Administrative Company announced that it has extended the application window for the E-Rate program. Because of technical problems encountered by applicants in the filing process, USAC has made some changes and extended the closing date to May 26, 2016.

If schools and dioceses have not begun the process, there is still time to file a Form 470 by April 26 and comply with the 28 day waiting period before filing the Form 471 by May 26.

More information is available on the USAC website

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Since almost 4 billion dollars will be available for discounted services, this is an opportunity to acquire or enhance broadband connectivity for classrooms. Every school should apply!

The E-rate site contains a new “File Along with Me” blog that uses a friendly, step-by-step approach to help schools apply for E-rate Program funding.  Check it out here. www.filealongwitherate.org

For the application process, USAC is utilizing a new E-rate information technology system and this is initial launch of a new may have some problems that will need to be addressed as they arise.

Meanwhile, it is important that applicants take all the important steps possible to prepare for the filing of the FCC Form 471, including posting an FCC Form 470 (as the FCC Form 470 has been available since July) and completing your competitive bidding process. Applicants are also encouraged to log on to EPC, make sure your profile information is accurate, and post your FCC Form 470 which must be available for 28 days before filing Form 471.

The best way to support your successful filing of your E-rate application is to start now with your account and user information. You can set up your account in the EPC Portal, assign user rights and establish or update your profile.

CAPE Board, State CAPE Representatives, Monthly Meeting Group

This post was contributed by Joe McTighe, Executive Director of the Council for American Private Education (CAPE).

To close the loop on the outstanding educators event at the White House, we received word last night (see below) that the nominee from the Rhode Island CAPE, Joseph T. Brennan, has been selected to attend an event with President Obama on May 3 honoring great educators.  Mr. Brennan is principal at Bishop Hendricken High School in Warwick, RI.  Here’s the bio submitted on his behalf:

BrennanJoseph10

Mr. Brennan knows all 900 students by name and something about each of them.  They know he is their advocate and best support.  He is also firm, fair and just.  The students respect him.  The faculty respect him.  The parents have complete respect for him.  He embodies the mission of the school in thought, word and deed.   He understands teaching and learning and like any good principal he is the principal or first teacher in the school.  He is a man of virtue and integrity.  He is always present and present for anyone who needs him.  He consistently excercises excellent judgment.  His reputation as an educator extends well beyond the school community.  He leads by serving others and models high expectations, sincerity and humility.  He’s a great principal and a great man.

Our congratulations to Mr. Brennan and our thanks to everyone who nominated outstanding educators for the event.  CAPE submitted a total of 33 names to the WH for consideration.

We Must Never Forget

This post was contributed by Christopher Cosentino, Associate Superintendent of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

Bearing Witnes

Associate Superintendent Christopher Cosentino with WWII Veteran and Buchenwald Camp Liberator Sol Goldstein keynote speaker at “Lessons of the Shoah” at John Carroll High School.

I can vaguely remember what I was doing when I was 18 years old.  I am grateful that “back in the day” we didn’t have the type of social media my children are growing up using in their daily lives.  Not that I was doing anything immoral or illegal, I was just acting like a typical 18 year old boy who thought he was smarter than he actually was at the time.

One person I had the distinct pleasure of meeting can vividly remember exactly what he was doing when he was 18 years old.  It is a story so powerful, that I believe not only my children, but all young people need to hear it.  I say that because this gentleman, and many others like him, helped to end an unthinkable and inhuman event in the course of history.

At the age of 93 years old, Mr. Sol Goldstein can tell you exactly what he was doing on Tuesday, June 6, 1944.  Mr. Goldstein had just turned 18 years old and was in the midst of making history.  He was one of the many brave souls who was a part of the Allied Forces that stormed the beaches of Normandy, France to bring about the liberation of occupied Europe and to eventually bring to light a horrific crime against humanity that many didn’t even know was occurring.  He tells the story as if it had just happened.  At the ripe age of 18 he was now in charge of his platoon because forty percent of the men had been killed in the time them to exit their boats and reach the beachhead.

Despite the horror he must have been witnessing, Mr. Goldstein and his platoon stuck to their duty and pressed on.  After taking the beach, he and the men under his command marched deeper into Europe and continued their mission working to bring an end to the war.  At one point the soldiers detected a terrible smell than none of them could explain.  As they followed the stench they came across some type of camp.  (They would later learn it was the concentration camp known as Buchenwald Camp). Entering the fenced area, as the soldier in charge, Mr. Goldstein broke away from the platoon and ventured ahead.  He encountered men and women who in his words didn’t look human.  They looked like skeletons with skin hanging off their bodies.

Having the ability to speak Yiddish, Mr. Goldstein was able to communicate with one of the people who approached the strangers who just entered the camp.  The man, speaking in German, asked Mr. Goldstein who was he and was he American.  Mr. Goldstein responded and said “I am not only an American, I am a Jew.”  The man’s response, which still brought tears to Mr. Goldstein’s eyes as he shared this, said “what took you so long?”

This story is just one of many like it that we have heard told since the successful end of World War II.  To this day it is difficult to fathom that over six million Jewish people were summarily executed because of their faith.

If Mr. Goldstein had returned to the states after his tour and done nothing else he would still rightfully so be considered a hero.  That experience; however, inspired Mr. Goldstein to travel the world to assist persecuted people in need of help and rescue. As I shared earlier, Mr. Goldstein is a vibrant 93 years young.  He will sadly though not live forever so at some point his story must be told by others.  This is vital for us all.  What occurred some seventy two years ago unfortunately still occurs in some parts of the world today.  A fact not lost on Mr. Goldstein. It is our duty to listen to stories from Mr. Goldstein and others and take up the mantel and share their acts of heroism and social justice with everyone.

Programs like “Lessons of the Shoah”, hosted by The John Carroll School in Bel Air, MD where I heard Mr. Goldstein are truly a shining example of making sure these stories are never forgotten.  And just as important, is that people like Mr. Goldstein and those he helped liberate are also remembered.

NCEA has partnered with the ADL to bring the Bearing Witness program to Catholic Educators across the country.  This program provides an all-expense paid, intensive professional development experience to help teachers have a greater understanding of the historic anti-Semitism contributing to the Holocaust as well as an examination of the events from a Catholic perspective.  To learn more about the Bearing Witness program or to apply to attend, you can find more information at www.adl.org/national-bearing-witness.  NCEA is also offering a free webinar about the Echoes and Reflections Holocaust education curriculum.  You can register for the webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7400283175131242753.  For more information about the program, contact NCEA Manager of Educational Resources Andrea Kopp at akopp@ncea.org.

NCEA 2016 Convention & Expo Presenter Snaps – Dr. Timothy Dickel

This post was contributed by Dr. Timothy Dickel, President of Mater Dei High School in Evansville, Indiana.

Tim Dickel

Please join us on Wednesday, March 30 (1:30-2:25PM)) as Dr. Timothy Dickel will present “Ensuring Long-Term Sustainability through the Establishment and Growth of a Planned Giving Society”.

Ensuring Long-Term Sustainability through the Establishment and Growth of a Planned Giving Society

Are you concerned about the future sustainability of your Catholic school? Over the next fifty years, between $40-50 trillion dollars will be transferred from one generation to the next. A significant amount of money will be transferred through charitable bequests, but only a small percentage of Catholic schools have an established planned giving program. There is a tremendous opportunity for Catholic schools to benefit from planned giving and endowments.

Does your school have a plan for planned giving? If not, this session will help you learn the basics of planned giving and how to create a planned giving society at a Catholic school. A planned giving and endowment program can provide your school a new source of income. Schools with healthy endowments will have a greater chance of long term sustainability than those with small or nonexistent endowments. If your school already has a planned giving program, this session will provide you with relevant statistics and best practices for planned giving.

I serve as the President of Mater Dei High School in Evansville, Indiana, and we established a planned giving program in 2010 that now consists of over 80 members. In addition, the school’s endowment balances have increased from $600,000 to $2,000,000. We utilized an approach that took a relatively small but consistent investment of time while still focusing on our annual fund, special events, and a capital campaign.

After the presentation, attendees will feel comfortable getting started with the establishment of a planned giving program. You will learn how to assemble a volunteer planned giving team, identify planned giving prospects, speak knowledgeably about planned giving vehicles, access resources, and other important information.

Saint Joseph’s Catholic Academy Students Collected Nearly 500 lbs of Items for Food Bank

This post was contributed by Shelly Mato, English, History, & Curriculum Coordinator at Saint Joseph’s Catholic Academy.

St. Joseph

The Pennsylvania State budget stalemate has left food banks across the state short on funds.

Food banks throughout Pennsylvania are suffering,” said Carol Pioli, Executive Director of State College Food Bank. “Some of us haven’t received the funding we rely on to help those in need in our communities.

Students at Saint Joseph’s Catholic Academy in Boalsburg saw an opportunity to help. Led by the school’s Service Club, students, parents, faculty, and staff worked together to collect enough items to help restock the shelves of the food bank following its busy holiday season. The donation drive brought in more than 500 items, weighing 493 pounds, to help local individuals and families in need. Items collected included oatmeal, coffee, rice, canned meats, condiments, sugar, soap, shampoo, and more.

“The donation from Saint Joe’s came at a critical time,” said Pioli. “Donations are important year round, but especially after the holiday season. People are very generous in December,” she continued, “but that can make January tough. As the holiday spirit dwindles, so do donations.”

We knew that supplies at the food bank would be low after the holidays,” said SJCA student Jordan Wiser. “We rallied around Service—one of our four pillars—and thanks to tremendous generosity, we collected a lot of items on the “greatest need list” we received from the food bank. It was a perfect opportunity to come together as a school to serve our community.

Saint Joseph’s Catholic Academy, founded in 2011, provides a Christ-centered environment in which students grow and develop and live out the four pillars of faith, scholarship, leadership, and service to our God, their fellow students, their families, and the community.

E-Rate Reminder

This post was contributed by Dale McDonald, PBVM, PhD, NCEA Director of Public Policy.

The 2016 E-Rate Application period opened on February 3 and will close on April 29.  Since almost 4 billion dollars will be available for discounted services, this is an opportunity to acquire or enhance broadband connectivity for classrooms. Every school should apply!

The E-rate site contains a new “File Along with Me” blog that uses a friendly, step-by-step approach to help schools apply for E-rate Program funding.  Check it out here. www.filealongwitherate.org

For the application process, USAC is utilizing a new E-rate information technology system and this is initial launch of a new may have some problems that will need to be addressed as they arise.

Meanwhile, it is important that applicants take all the important steps possible to prepare for the filing of the FCC Form 471, including posting an FCC Form 470 (as the FCC Form 470 has been available since July) and completing your competitive bidding process. Applicants are also encouraged to log on to EPC, make sure your profile information is accurate, and post your FCC Form 470 which must be available for 28 days before filing Form 471.

The best way to support your successful filing of your E-rate application is to start now with your account and user information. You can set up your account in the EPC Portal, assign user rights and establish or update your profile.

For more information on how to complete the tasks mentioned above, visit USAC’s Schools and Libraries website.

Holy Trinity School’s CSW Assembly

Tuesday’s theme, as part of Catholic Schools Week, celebrates students!

Holy Trinity CSW

At an assembly at Holy Trinity School in Georgetown, D.C., students wore whacky hats and socks while sharing information about each class’ service projects. The students also listened to the eyewitness account of Sara Blauvelt, Director of Catechesis for the Archdiocese of Washington, who told the students all about her visit to Rwanda and the great work being done through CRS Rice Bowl. Catholic Relief Services’ Rice Bowl is the Lenten faith-in-action program for families and faith communities where a simple cardboard box—a CRS Rice Bowl—inspires prayers, fasting and alms-giving within Catholic families across the U.S.

Academic Excellence in Catholic Schools – Catholic Schools Provide a Bright Future for Students

This post was contributed by Chelsea Kelly, student at Cristo Rey Brooklyn High School in Brooklyn, New York and 2015 Seton Scholar Recipient.

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It’s the 2nd grade and my mom told me it was time to take my communion classes. Of course I didn’t understand what that meant but by what I was told, I got to hang out with friends and become closer to God. The moment I was done with my classes, I got to eat the bread and drink the grape juice at Mass. It was the best moment for me and my friends because it was such a big occasion.

Having the whole entire school together was just exciting for me at that age. But, to say the least, that was when I was just an average kid that didn’t know the real meaning of the occasion. I realize now that going to these classes was more for the social aspect and less for the religion aspect, but I’m glad I was set down that path when I was so young.  I attended Catholic school from Pre-K to the 4th grade and then resumed attending for my high school career.  During the years that I was not enrolled in Catholic school I was enrolled in public school.  I didn’t know the meaning of what it was to be like in a Catholic school and the opportunities that were given to me until it was taken away from me.

I’ve always learned that if you don’t turn to God on your own, going through a struggle for sure will make you turn to God.  And that’s what it did.  During my freshmen year transitioning into my sophomore year, my mom was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer.  This was the hardest time of my life, my personal struggle.  But one thing I remembered was that I wasn’t going through this struggle alone.  Every week a teacher or my principal would ask me how is my mom doing. I always had tremendous emotional support from everyone at school. I believe that if I was anywhere else where family, community, and unity wasn’t cherished like it was in school, it would have been even harder. Being in school I was encouraged to continue praying and keep my faith in God, and to believe He is everywhere with us. Just knowing I have people to lean on and assure me that I can be strong for myself and my family. I knew that going through that event and having that support meant that if I ever needed reassurance or needed someone to talk to, these people were always there – and they made sure I knew God was there as well.

Looking back at my 2nd grade self and comparing it to my 12th grade self, I was someone who didn’t have a firm belief and faith in God. Being in Catholic school has helped me understand the values of what God can do in my life. I really saw how God works through the people that follow him.  Having the support that I had showed me ways to lean on God, and I am thankful for that.

E-rate Funding Year 2016 Application Filing Window

The window for filing E-rate applications for Funding Year (FY) 2016 will open February 3 at noon EST and close April 29 at 11:59:59 PM EDT.

For the application process, USAC is utilizing a new E-rate information technology system and this is initial launch of a new may have some problems that will need to be addressed as they arise.

Meanwhile, it is important that applicants take all the important steps possible to prepare for the filing of the FCC Form 471, including posting an FCC Form 470 (as the FCC Form 470 has been available since July) and completing your competitive bidding process. Applicants are also encouraged to log on to EPC, make sure your profile information is accurate, and post your FCC Form 470 which must be available for 28 days before filing Form 471.

The best way to support your successful filing of your E-rate application is to start now with your account and user information. You can set up your account in the EPC Portal, assign user rights and establish or update your profile.

For more information on how to complete the tasks mentioned above, visit USAC’s Schools and Libraries website.